Marketing for Lighting Setups

August 21, 2012  •  1 Comment
John-Paul Zajackowski shooting from a ladder in a ballroom Two weekends ago I was at the Fairmont Hotel in Washington, D.C. shooting a photo set of all the lighting that PSAV had set up for a wedding that day. The idea behind the shoot is that PSAV will use the photos for marketing to up their sales for upcoming potential weddings and events that will be held at the Fairmont. So how did I get shots like the one below?
Foyer in the Fairmont Hotel in Washington, D.C.
Ballroom in the Fairmont Hotel in Washington, D.C. A camera with a wide angle lens, a tripod, multiple exposures for each scene, and a lot of patience. That's it! Well there's a little more to it than that, but that's the basic recipe. I came in earlier in the day, hours before the start of the wedding reception, to scope everything out and start where I could. I was able to get to the three shots in the foyer while there was hardly any traffic or clutter in the room. Inside of the ballroom later on was a completely different story! So I set my camera up on the tripod using my Tokina 11-16mm lens and started taking 
4-8 shots of each scene at different exposures. The reason for doing this was that the room is much dimmer than the lit areas from the lights, which in turn is dim as well compared to the actual light fixtures themselves. The human eye can see a great difference in brightness, but the sensor on a camera isn't even close to having the dynamic range of brightness we humans can see. Foyer in the Fairmont Hotel in Washington, D.C.
Once I got to the ballroom, the game was a totally different beast! Even though the majority of the lights were set up already, the decorators had to set their decor up as well (including the pipe and drape pictured on the left). This was something I had to wait for so that the mood of the room was just right and the final images depict what a complete ballroom setup would look like.

After everything was all set and ready to go, banquets had to start setting their tables since this was a working ballroom for an actual wedding reception. As soon as banquets finally finished setting their tables, as Murphey's law would have it, the band started setting up their equipment, lights, and instruments on stage. So I started working all my angles at this point trying my best to keep them out of the shot. By the time the band finished setting, the three wedding photographers (Yes! Three of them!) walked into the room to get their shots. Luckily we all worked together and tried our best to keep out of each others' shots.

You can view the entire gallery of all the shots here


Comments

1.Rimas(non-registered)
Nicely done! Love your work.
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